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Parent Teacher Conference Tips


This is part 2 of our Spring Break series. On Sunday we learned of the Questions That You Should Be Asking Your Child's Teacher. Well where is the best place to ask those questions but at a Parent Teacher Conference. Parent teacher conferences are perfect for getting to know your child’s teacher a little better, as well as discover how your child is doing in school. Oftentimes, schools schedule parent teacher conferences at the beginning of the year. Some schools even schedule a second round of parent teacher conferences sometime during the second semester, giving you the opportunity to check in on your child. If your child’s school is offering parent teacher conferences, these tips can help you have a successful meeting.


Schedule Early

Many times, parent teacher conferences go throughout the day and into the evening hours. This can last for 1-2 days, depending on how much time the school has set aside for conferences. Because this can be a long day for your child’s teacher, try scheduling your conferences early. Pick a time that works best for you but that doesn’t take away from the teacher’s personal time.

Ask Questions

When you’re at your child’s parent teacher conference, it is important to ask questions. Ask the teacher how your child is doing academically, as well as how they are doing behaviorally and socially. Knowing more about how your kid is doing in school is vital to your child’s success for the year.

Discover How You Can Help

Your child’s education is not a one-man job. As hard as your child’s teacher works to make sure that the entire class succeeds, it can be hard to meet the needs of thirty children. In order to make sure your child learns what they need to, ask your child’s teacher what you can do to support their education. If they’re struggling in reading, see what kind of books you should be reading with them. If they don’t understand how addition works, ask for some math games to play at home. Your child’s teacher will be grateful for the help and your kid will definitely have the advantage more people helping push them towards success.

Let's discuss: What questions do you ask your child’s teacher during conferences?

Annmarie John
36 Comments
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36 comments:

  1. Our conferences are 10 minutes. Exactly - they time us. It's NOT enough time.

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    1. 10 minutes really is no time for a conference. Someone needs to bring that up with them.

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  2. Open communication is the key. If you do not communicate ideas to your teacher, they will not know your expectations and together you will not get the best results.

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    1. Exactly. You really should be able to communicate with your kids teachers.

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  3. I was a teacher for a while and I think these are great tips for getting the most out of parent teacher conferences. I always told parents not to be afraid to ask questions.

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    1. I'm not so sure why parents are afraid to ask questions. I usually have a list of things I want to know, especially for my 11 year old who is autistic.

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  4. Funny you asked. I always get really nervous for these, for some odd reason that probably has to do with my own youth! Generally Cassidy gets antsy when they talk about academic stuff, and just wants to know if she's happy and liked. Cute, right? It still works because she's only six..

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    1. You really shouldn't be? Maybe you need to write a list of questions you want to ask beforehand. Try it one day.

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  5. These sound like some awesome tips, I can imagine it is a lot of information to take in, in one night. x

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    1. It sometimes can be but parent teacher conferences are something that you need to get involved with.

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  6. I love these ideas. You want to get the most out of those conferences. They're very important!

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    1. Yes they are. Anything that involves your kids education is very important.

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  7. Im so glad we can have time to chat with the teacher about our kids' progress. It has really helped my kids to be able to make changes and learn more.

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    1. That's what these conferences are for. So happy to hear that you're making the best of them.

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  8. I always ask my children's teachers if there is anything we can do to help with homework or keep them interested in their work.

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    1. That's great and that's one that you really should be asking. Way to go!

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  9. While I've never done a parent-teacher conference for my children, I participated in them as a early childhood educator.

    I love it when the parents come with questions and are interested and engaged. I delight when they get excited by the work their children did too!

    Thanks for sharing!
    xoxo

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    1. And those are the parents you want. The ones who are truly engaged and willing to get involved. So happy to hear that you had a few of those.

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  10. My son has been having a hard time in school this year. He speaks English at home but goes to a French only school. So he's been having some issues with reading and sentence structure. So we've had a couple meetings with his teacher. It's so important for parents to also be involved in their child's learning. We always ask what we can do to help him at home. This year his teacher is really great.

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    1. It is really important. When we show our kids that we care about their education, they in turn care about it as well.

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  11. I used to dread these when my daughter was little. She used to talk in class a lot and they always seemed to focus on that.

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    1. You sound like my mother. It's what was always on my report card, "talks a lot".

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  12. It's so important to have open communication with your child's teacher. My husband and I have never missed not even one conference.

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    1. And you shouldn't. You're so involved with your kids education and I have to admit that I've missed 1 or 2 but due to my military career and I couldn't reschedule. I try not to miss any now that I'm at home.

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  13. These are great tips for Parent Teacher interviews. We are just starting down this road with our kids.

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    1. Since you're just starting out then it's definitely going to be a long road. Enjoy it and be sure to ask those questions.

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  14. I completely agree that coming to the conference with a clear set of questions is essential! I'm not sure if this is something that can be negotiated, but I feel that parent-teacher conferences about 7-8 weeks into the school year are better than those scheduled in the Spring, because it gives everyone (parents, teachers, and kids) time to set goals and make changes. My son's preschool parent-teacher conferences were in the Spring, but his Kindergarten one was in the Fall---much more helpful!!

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    1. I'm also not sure if that could be negotiated but that is a great idea. Ours are set in the Fall as well but we make it work.

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  15. Here the conferences are only in the daytime. I was surprised they didn't flex in the evening for parents who can't get that time. Going in with a set of questions is smart though. I do that here too!

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    1. I'm surprised they didn't either especially so many parents work during the day. I always have my list of questions that I take with me.

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  16. Thanks for the great advice here.
    I plan on passing this on to my sister who has a 7yr old daughter.

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  17. Thank God I homeschool and am always up to date on how my children are doing. I don't know if I would like having to wait until a predesignated time in order to find out where my child is struggling. I'd like to know immediately to start taking actions to help fix it.

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    1. That's the thing though, you don't have to wait. You should always have open communication with your kids teacher and you should be able to contact them at any time. You don't need to wait until Parent-Teacher conference.

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  18. These are some great tips to keep in mind! I always feel obnoxious when going into my daughters conferences because I bring a list of a million questions to ask! I like to think it's better to ask too many than none at all ;-)

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    1. Oh I most certainly agree with you. I do the same. I always have a million and one questions to ask because I want to know what's going on.

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[name=AnnMarie John] [img=https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-X9gUeVik-ZY/WJjwNTOobII/AAAAAAABTJ4/qEhU0n62_AIo-j6-6LA2OFOr44lKCHASwCLcB/s100/AnnMarie%2BJohn%2BHeadshot.JPG] [description=AnnMarie John is a lifestyle blogger, mom of 4, retired army veteran and a huge Disney lover. Formerly from the beautiful island of St. Vincent and the Grenadines in the Caribbean and now living in colorful Colorado, she loves sharing her opinions on everything, crafting and food.] (facebook=http://www.facebook.com/theannmariejohn) (instagram=http://www.instagram.com/theannmariejohn) (twitter=http://www.twitter.com/theannmariejohn) (pinterest=http://www.pinterest.com/theannmariejohn) (email=mailto:annmarie@annmariejohn.com)

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