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How to Reward Your Children


Raising children can be difficult yet rewarding. As your children grow, you want them to learn how to do things, such as getting dressed all by themselves, use the potty on their own, and do chores around the house. Because it can be tricky to get kids to want to do all of these things, setting up a reward system to get them motivated is a great idea. Here are some tips you can use to reward your children for achieving their goals.

Set Goals

Before you can reward your children, they need to have goals in place. Decide what behavior you want to see and set a goal that’s easily attainable. If you have young children, you might want to have goals for each time they do what you want them to. As your children get older, you can stretch out those goals to last over longer periods of time. You’ll want to transition them into achieving the behavior for a full day or a full week.

Track Their Effort

Don’t forget to track your children’s efforts! Visuals are great incentives for children, especially when it comes to working towards a long-term goal. If your child is just starting out potty training, create a potty chart that stays in the bathroom. Then, each time your child uses the potty, they can add a sticker to their chart. Not only will this help your kids take responsibility for their goals, it’ll help you keep track of how well they’re doing.

Pick a Reward

After setting up a goal and tracking system, it’s time to figure out which reward your kids will work towards! The best thing you can do is talk to your kids and figure out a reward that they’ll be excited about. Rewards can be anything, from a day of no chores to a trip to a favorite play place. You can also reward your kids with a toy, a movie date, or letting them pick dinner for the night.

Follow Through

If you’ve gone through the trouble to get your kids excited about a reward, it’s important that you follow through with your promises. Give your kids their desired reward as soon as they achieve their goal so that they can have instant gratification for their efforts. If you forget to reward them or forget to make rewards a big deal, then your reward system could lose its effect on their excitement.

Rewarding your children for a job well done is a great way to keep their positive behavior coming.

What are some ways you reward your kids?


Annmarie John
44 Comments
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44 comments:

  1. Depending on the situation, we have different rewards. For example, my little guy struggles with spelling, so every time he gets a 100% on his spelling tests, he gets to go out to dinner at a restaurant of his choice.

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    1. That's totally understandable and I know he would love to get 100% all the time if he gets to choose the restaurant.

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  2. Since my daughter is a teen her reward system has changed a bit bi tend to give her a little more freedom, like hanging with friends or extra computer time.

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    1. Different ages do deserve different rewards and I'm sure she enjoys that.

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  3. My two children are grown now and we did this when they were little and all through their years actually. Instead of spoiling our children we felt that we wanted them to be proud of their own independence. We offered incentives to reach good grades, chores around the house that continued on into adulthood. Now they are good citizens, responsible adults and parents. They make me proud.

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    1. That is awesome Rena. It's what we strive for with all our children. I don't believe in spoiling kids myself so we offer incentives and we do punishment in our household as well.

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  4. These are great reward strategies for children. I love giving my kids things.

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    1. Giving isn't everything though, they also need to understand why they're getting the things you're giving.

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  5. It depends. Our daughter does fantastic in school, so when she brings home her perfect report card, we usually let her buy something, an article of clothing, a toy when she was younger, something she looked forward to.

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    1. That's a great way to do it. A perfect report card certainly deserves a reward.

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  6. How do I reward my kids? Normally it is randomly done. For example if I see my 8 year help me clean without asking her to do or without complaining, I will reward her with some cash.

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    1. And we all know how much kids love cash. I would never complain if I could get some cash. :)

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  7. Great post! My kids are so far from spoiled, but they are by no means lacking! We do rewards and punishments. It all depends on the situations. Rewards include Movie dates, special meals out... etc.

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    1. Oh we do the same thing as well and I don't think they're spoilt either. Rewards and punishment are doled out as necessary.

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  8. Having a reward system was fun for both myself and the kids. A trip to the pizza restaurant was a big one!

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    1. I'm sure they surely enjoyed that. We're big pizza fans here too so I might add that as a reward to our list as well.

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  9. It's been so many years since I rewarded my child, but I tried to stay away from monetary rewards and used mostly verbal praise as much as possible. Giving you kid something every time they do something right can get expensive. I think for big accomplishments, like a great report card maybe something small is ok.

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    1. Oh I certainly agree. If every time the kids does something right, that they're supposed to do in the first place, they get something then it can surely become expensive.

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  10. It has been so long that I don't remember how I rewarded my Daughter. I do think that setting goals is a super idea.

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    1. Oh I agree Terry, setting goals is definitely important. Gives them something to aim towards.

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  11. We used sticker charts for a lot of our children's things, like potty training and toothbrushing. They liked being able to track their progress visually.

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    1. Sticker charts is great for younger kids like my toddler but my bigger kids would totally laugh at that. :)

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  12. My issue is follow through! However.... Today, oh man. Got Jaiden's interim and he lost his kindle for a week. We are cracking down on all thing education and pushing the limits. I was really disappointed in my sons lack of effort. He's a smart kid and loves school but when he's there he doesn't show the effort. So we are now changing a way of doing things. If he does good all week in school and at home, he can have games for the weekend. and if he keeps it back up I will change it so he can have them an hour a night. They joys of being a parent! AHHHHHH

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    1. Oh I think that might be a problem for most parents even me sometimes. I don't always follow through and kids love consistency.

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  13. I have a reward chart I just started working on for my kids that I hope to finish this week.

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    1. I hope you're able to finish. It will be great to see what your reward charts looks like.

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  14. I find that words work best with my girls. I try to let them know what they did was a big deal and also ask them how they feel about it. Often they say "good", "happy", "proud". I love it!

    Thanks for sharing.
    xoxo

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    1. That is awesome Jennifer. Now that my toddler is talking more than ever I will have to try this with her as well.

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  15. My struggle is always the follow through! Thank you for the reminder. We have some things to make sure we get through by tomorrow!

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    1. I hope you're able to follow through tomorrow. I'll be here thinking of you and hoping that you make it.

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  16. We use Dave Ramsey's commission system and reward with cash. It allows them to understand how cash works and how to save. We also do some other things for dinner out or other things that he wants. Sticker charts never worked that great. But I have two more kids coming up.

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    1. I have read the Dave Ramsey books but never thought of implementing it with the kids. That's a great idea.

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  17. We sometimes rewarded our kids but we tried to teach them that the "doing" was reward in itself so they didn't always expect something.

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    1. And I absolutely agree with that Lois. Not everything deserves a reward.

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  18. When the kids were younger we used sticker charts. When they would earn a certain amount of stickers it would get them a something of their choice. Now that they are teenagers the reward is being allowed to take the car.

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    1. Isn't it amazing how the rewards change as they get older. While I can certainly give my toddler stickers for doing something good, my teenagers would certainly not like that.

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  19. It has been a long time for me and I am trying to think back for when my kids were young. I know we would go to special events like a baseball game as a reward and a dinner out was always something we used to reward something that was accomplished. I remember when I was young, a Friday night dinner to a Supper Club was very rare and always a reward for something very special that one of my siblings or myself had accomplished.

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  20. Following through is a big thing. I know kids take disappointment pretty hard and if you do it often enough it can carry with them through life. When I try to tell kiddo she needs to do x,y,z, I make sure we explain to her as to why she can't/can do x,y,z so that she understands and sees the value of what her dad and I are trying to teach her.

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  21. I think finding something simple that they like, such as a favorite snack or something is perfect; maybe even go out to a movie as well!

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  22. We usually don't reward with tangible items. We like to reward with praise. They seem to seek approval over trinkets, so that's what works for us.

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  23. Oh, I love this! We don't do charts although I think it would be a good idea. I do set goals and follow through, though! One of my favorites is to get her some sort of treat or toy and leave it in her carseat when I pick her up from school. It's always a surprise because I don't do it often enough to get her used to it.

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  24. When my son was little, he responded well to a reward chart with stickers. As he got older, he cared more about an allowance. I agree with you on the follow through. That's really important.

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  25. Having 4 children at home there is no one size fits all solution that's for sure. We pick what works best for each individual child.

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  26. These are great ideas! I will be trying these with my kids.

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[name=AnnMarie John] [img=https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-X9gUeVik-ZY/WJjwNTOobII/AAAAAAABTJ4/qEhU0n62_AIo-j6-6LA2OFOr44lKCHASwCLcB/s100/AnnMarie%2BJohn%2BHeadshot.JPG] [description=AnnMarie John is a lifestyle blogger, mom of 4, retired army veteran and a huge Disney lover. Formerly from the beautiful island of St. Vincent and the Grenadines in the Caribbean and now living in colorful Colorado, she loves sharing her opinions on everything, crafting and food.] (facebook=http://www.facebook.com/theannmariejohn) (instagram=http://www.instagram.com/theannmariejohn) (twitter=http://www.twitter.com/theannmariejohn) (pinterest=http://www.pinterest.com/theannmariejohn) (email=mailto:annmarie@annmariejohn.com)

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